Your Old Cell Phone: Trash or Treasure?

The latest iPhone release came out and it’s hard not to be tempted by a shiny new toy. But what do you do with your old cell phone? Let it sit in a drawer and collect dust? Throw it in the garbage? Or, maybe you could sell it online and grant it a second life.

But who would want your phone?

You’d be surprised how many people out there are looking for a gently-used cell phone. Just take a look at what is already posted on Kijiji, and you’ll see that buying and selling through the second-hand economy is more common than you think. On average, Canadians acquire and dispose of 76 items a year through the second-hand marketplace, with Kijiji being the most popular way of setting up sales, trades and exchanges.

Top three most acquired and disposed category of goods

  1. Clothing, Shoes & Fashion Accessories
  2. Entertainment Equipment
  3. Baby Clothing & Accessories

How you’re helping Canada

As great as it feels to make a little extra cash by selling something you don’t need, did you know that you’re also helping the environment?

By buying and selling through the second-hand economy, you’re keeping one more thing out of landfills. In fact, Canadians rank fourth worst in the world in terms of our personal ecological footprint*, and every chance we get to make a difference really counts.

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According to the Global Footprint Network, Canada ranks fourth worst in the world in terms of ecological footprint.

“Given the estimated scale of second-hand sales, it potentially resulted in GDP being about $34 billion higher in 2014.”
As you hand over your old cell phone to start a new life with someone in your community, you should also know you’re contributing to the Canadian economy, too. By keeping the transaction Canadian to Canadian, you’re keeping the money spent in our country: helping to create jobs, increase the value of our dollar and redistribute the wealth within the community.

Welcome to the second-hand economy.
How will you participate next?

*Source: www.footprintnetwork.org