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Date Listed 10-Jan-17
Address Toronto, ON M9M1A2
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Cobb Legal is a paralegal advocacy service provider, based out of Toronto (North York), Ontario.

Tim J. Cobb is a licensed paralegal in good standing with the Law Society of Upper Canada, and he is a member of the Ontario Paralegal Association. Tim represents clients with respect to issues relating to residential tenancies (Landlord Tenant Board) and Human Rights (Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario).

Cobb Legal is proud to serve clients in the Greater Toronto Area, including Scarborough, East York, North York, Etobicoke, Richmond Hill, Vaughan, Markham, Mississauga, Brampton, Oakville, Burlington, Pickering and Ajax.

Should you require legal representation, please do not hesitate to contact Cobb Legal by e-mail at cobblegal@outlook.com.

Initial consultations are free. If you cannot attend our office, we will make every effort to attend a location that is convenient for you to attend.


LANDLORD TENANT BOARD
The Residential Tenancies Act confers rights and responsibilities upon landlords and tenants. Keep in mind, there are certain types of leased residential properties that are exempt from the legislation. Moreover, depending on the type of property and when the property was built, there may be partial or full exemptions from the legislation.

Some of the issues that Cobb Legal can help you resolve are:
Determination of whether a Tenancy Agreement is valid;
Disclosure of certain information that a landlord must provide to the tenant;
Termination of tenancy;
Utilities;
Human rights infringements (discrimination, harassment, sexual harassment, or reprisal);
Security deposits;
Obligation to repair;
Assignment;
Subletting;
Abandoned units;
Unauthorized occupancy;
Rent increases;
Personal property;
Non-payment of rent;
Persistent late payment of rent;
Unlawful and lawful entry;
Employment has been terminated;
Misrepresentation of income;
Ceasing to meet qualifications in public housing;
Illegal activity;
Causing damage to property;
Interfering with reasonable enjoyment;
Impairing safety and overcrowding;
Landlord terminating tenancy to convert property for personal or family use;
Landlord terminating tenancy for property demolition;
Landlord terminating tenancy for property conversion to non-residential use;
Landlord terminating tenancy for property repairs or renovations;
Provincial Offences charges for alleged offences contrary to provisions of the Residential Tenancies Act; and
Enforcement of a Landlord Tenant Board Order

There are strict statutory deadlines with respect to bringing forth a Landlord Tenant Board application or defending one. Whether you are a landlord or tenant, contact Cobb Legal, as soon as possible, to retain professional legal representation, if you are having an issue with respect to a leased residential property.


HUMAN RIGHTS TRIBUNAL OF ONTARIO
The Ontario Human Rights Code Preamble states, in part, the purpose of the legislation, as follows:
“Whereas recognition of the inherent dignity and the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world and is in accord with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights as proclaimed by the United Nations;
And Whereas it is public policy in Ontario to recognize the dignity and worth of every person and to provide for equal rights and opportunities without discrimination that is contrary to law, and having as its aim the creation of a climate of understanding and mutual respect for the dignity and worth of each person so that each person feels a part of the community and able to contribute fully to the development and well-being of the community and the Province;
And Whereas these principles have been confirmed in Ontario by a number of enactments of the Legislature and it is desirable to revise and extend the protection of human rights in Ontario;…”

The Human Rights Code gives everyone equal rights and opportunities without discrimination relating to matters such as employment (including membership of a professional vocational association), housing, services, and contracts. The purpose of the Code is to prevent discrimination or harassment on the grounds of:
race or colour;
citizenship;
ancestry;
place of origin;
ethnic origin;
creed;
sex (which includes pregnancy);
sexual orientation;
age (means an age that is 18 or more);
record of offences (in the context of employment only);
marital or family status;
disability;
gender identity or gender expression; and
the receipt of public assistance (in the context of housing only).

What is Discrimination, Harassment, and Reprisal?
Discrimination broadly means treating another person differently and less than others.

Harassment is a form of discrimination. Harassment means vexatious comments or actions that are unwelcome to the person receiving the comments or actions, or comments or actions that ought to reasonably be known to be unwelcome.

Sexual harassment is defined in the Human Rights Code as an incident or series of incidents involving unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favours or other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature.

Reprisal is generally used in phrases like “fear of reprisal”, “free from reprisal” or “without reprisal”. The Human Rights Code protects claimants from being punished by someone for asserting the claimant’s rights under the Code. In other words, reprisal means revenge, retaliation, retribution, or payback.

There are some narrowly defined exceptions outlined in the Code wherein some acts of discrimination are permitted.

While some acts of discrimination are blatant and obvious, some are not. Discrimination can also be unintentional but a resolution must still be sought to end the conduct and compensate the claimant.

There are strict statutory deadlines with respect to bringing forth a Human Rights application or defending one.

Should you require legal representation, please do not hesitate to contact Cobb Legal by e-mail at cobblegal@outlook.com.

Initial consultations are free. If you cannot attend our office, we will make every effort to attend a location that is convenient for you to attend.
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